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Image used for representational purpose. (REUTERS)
Image used for representational purpose. (REUTERS)

Tesla ventilator made of car parts is an ode to engineering, boon for patients

  • Tesla recently released a video in which the company showcased its own ventilator which has been developed using car parts.
  • While there is no word yet on when Tesla would be able to take this ventilator into production, the company has otherwise been very active in procuring ventilators.

Tesla has been a pioneer in the field of electric cars for years now. Now, the company is taking the lead in manufacturing ventilators, a medical equipment crucial in the fight against coronavirus but one that is also in short supply around the world.

Tesla recently released a video in which the company showcased its own ventilator which has been developed using car parts. In the video, Tesla engineers display the early prototype of the ventilator which has several parts taken from cars. Some of the car components used are from Model 3’s HVAC system. Model 3's center screen and infotainment computer have also been put to use.

The engineers in the video admit that the ventilator is hardly anywhere close to production levels but that efforts are on to develop it even further. "There’s still a lot of work to do, but we are giving our best effort to make sure we can help some people out there," one of the engineers states in the video.

While there is no word yet on when Tesla would be able to take this ventilator into production, the company has otherwise been very active in procuring ventilators. Earlier in April, Tesla managed to secure 1,000 ventilators from China and distributed these to medical facilities across California. Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who previously faced flak for criticizing the 'panic around coronavirus', also announced that there are surplus ventilators that can be shipped anywhere in the world where Tesla dealership network exists. He also said that these would be free of cost and no delivery charges would be levied either but that the only condition was for these to be put to use immediately and not be stored in warehouses or anywhere else.

A number of automakers around the world have started putting their capabilities to use to help in the fight against coronavirus pandemic. While some have donated money and others are helping with supplies of key medical equipment, a few - like Tesla -are actively developing these products.

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