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Yamaha three-wheeled motorcycle
Yamaha three-wheeled motorcycle

A new leaning Yamaha three-wheeled motorcycle in the works

  • The new Yamaha leaning three-wheeler features a setup that is completely different from the Yamaha Niken's system.

While only yesterday a spy image of the next-gen Yamaha's Cygnus-X 125 scooter surfaced on the internet, now new patent images suggest that Yamaha might have another new product on its plate in the form of a leaning three-wheeler.

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The design seen on the latest patents is slightly different from the present Niken leaning three-wheeled motorcycle. While the Niken uses a four telescopic fork layout, the new technology seen in the patent images looks inspired from that of the Brudeli's Leanster design as it uses a double wishbone layout. For the record, the system Brudeli used was bought by Yamaha in 2017.

The double wishbones can be seen attached to a centrally mounted shock absorber. This is a fairly simple layout, especially against the Niken's. Moreover, it also allows lowered centre of gravity, hence aiding better stability and handling.

The patent design features an actuator to control the lean angle.
The patent design features an actuator to control the lean angle.

The current tilting front suspension setup featured in the three-wheelers such as the Niken and Tricity, is significantly heavy and has its own share of complications such as heavier front-end as well as higher centre of gravity.

Brudeli retailed KTM-based trikes which featured the leaning front suspension system. These vehicles were sold under the Leanster barnd. The new Yamaha patent trike shows a similar system as the Brudeli Leanster. This system is bolted on to the setup which is a combination of Yamaha TMAX 650's chassis and engine.

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Expect a near production-spec prototype of a leaning Yamaha TMAX to be introduced sometime later this year. When looked upon closely, the patent also reveals an additional actuator which functions to control the lean angle.

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