Home > Auto > News > Audi to slash 9,500 jobs in Germany by 2025: statement
FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, March 14, 2019, the logo of the German car manufacturer Audi is pictured on a Audi e-tron prior to the annual press conference in Ingolstadt, Germany. The Ingolstadt-based automaker said Tuesday Nov. 26, 2019, that it expected to add 2,000 new positions while Volkswagen subsidiary Audi says it is cutting 9,500 jobs in Germany through 2025. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader, FILE) (AP)
FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, March 14, 2019, the logo of the German car manufacturer Audi is pictured on a Audi e-tron prior to the annual press conference in Ingolstadt, Germany. The Ingolstadt-based automaker said Tuesday Nov. 26, 2019, that it expected to add 2,000 new positions while Volkswagen subsidiary Audi says it is cutting 9,500 jobs in Germany through 2025. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader, FILE) (AP)

Audi to slash 9,500 jobs in Germany by 2025: statement

  • The job cuts will be achieved through an early retirement programme and natural turnover, the company said, adding that it would continue to hire in areas such as electromobility and digitisation.

German carmaker Audi said Tuesday it planned to slash 9,500 jobs in Germany by 2025, as part of a massive restructuring plan to save billions by 2029.

The job cuts will be achieved through an early retirement programme and natural turnover, the company said, adding that it would continue to hire in areas such as electromobility and digitisation.

The move would contribute towards the "optimisation of production capacities at the two German plants" while also offering the remaining workforce job guarantees up to the end of 2029, it said in a statement.

"The six billion euros ($6.6 billion) thus generated will secure the strategic targeted return corridor of 9 to 11 percent and will flow into future projects such as electrification and digitisation," it added.

The reorganisation comes as Audi, part of the Volkswagen Group, is making a costly and painful switch from combustion engines to an electric fleet.

Hit by falling sales, revenues and operating profits over the first nine months of 2019, the high-end subsidiary has also suffered more than other German manufacturers from the introduction last year of the new WLTP emissions testing standards in the European Union.

At the same time, it has ramped up spending on new technologies, including battery-electric and hybrid vehicles, connectivity and autonomous driving.

Like other brands in the Volkswagen group, it is still struggling to turn the page on the diesel gate scandal -- stunning revelations that the carmaker giant fitted illegal "defeat devices" to fool regulators' emissions tests.

This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text.

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