Home > Auto > News > Thailand's first drive-in theatre offers AC pipes to keep cars cool on hot days

Keen for the big screen but wary of the coronavirus, Thai film fans flocked to a new drive-in cinema on Thursday, which offered a novel cooling system to help combat the discomfort of being confined to cars on a hot and stuffy night.

About 80 vehicles pulled up in a car park to attend Bangkok's inaugural outdoor screening of the "Trolls World Tour", part of a special four-day offering for moviegoers who want to avoid indoor theatres.

To beat the tropical heat, organisers created a network of plastic pipes in the parking lot connected to dozens of smaller, flexible tubes, to channel cool air into cars through gaps in the windows.

(Also see pics: How Thailand's first drive-in cinema is beating the hot, humid weather)

With evening temperature of 28 degrees Celsius (82.4°F) and 78% humidity, Sasanan Thanasankulang said she wasn't sure what level of comfort to expect from the makeshift theatre.

A worker installs a pipeline containing an air-condition into a car to deal with the hot and humid weather at the drive-in movie theatre.
A worker installs a pipeline containing an air-condition into a car to deal with the hot and humid weather at the drive-in movie theatre. (REUTERS)

"I came with my mother, I wanted to bring her to experience the new drive-in movie theatre," she said.

"We were curious about how this drive-in movie theatre could deal with the hot and humid weather, and we didn't turn on the engine."

Thailand has emerged as one of Asia's Covid-19 success stories, with no domestic transmission in the past 38 days and only 58 deaths among its 3,179 confirmed cases.

(Also read: Drive-in haunted house in Japan offers scare, with social distancing in place)

It has eased most restrictions to try to revive an economy badly hit by the pandemic, with bars, karaoke and massage parlours the latest businesses allowed to reopen.

Air conditioning pipes to deal with the hot and humid weather are seen at the first drive-in movie theatre in Bangkok, Thailand,
Air conditioning pipes to deal with the hot and humid weather are seen at the first drive-in movie theatre in Bangkok, Thailand, (REUTERS)

Though Thai cinemas have been open for one month with limited seating and regular disinfection, Apitchaya Doungsuwan said she felt safer in her car and was willing to pay the 1,200 baht ($38.63) fee per vehicle, which includes popcorn and soft drinks.

(Also read: Humans now in 'cages' as drive-through zoo confines patrons to cars)

"I want to try new things and I worry a bit about the spread of the Covid-19 in the movie theatre," she said.

"If the experience from tonight is good, sure we will come back."

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