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With more and more vehicles returning to the roads, the concept of car sanitisation is picking up. (This photo of a traffic jam on Delhi-Noida border on May 20 morning is used for representational purpose) (ANI)
With more and more vehicles returning to the roads, the concept of car sanitisation is picking up. (This photo of a traffic jam on Delhi-Noida border on May 20 morning is used for representational purpose) (ANI)

Startup, drive: Roadside car sanitisation for 50 defines Covid business model

  • Four men in Delhi take inspiration from the need to be in a clean and germ-free vehicle to start a roadside sanitisation facility.
  • These men previously ran a business to clean sofas, kitchens etc but earnings had tanked due to the national lockdown.

With the gradual opening up after nearly two months of the Covid-19 imposed lockdown, businesses are looking at opportunities like 'vehicle sanitisation' to get back on track.

A car cleaning venture in the national capital, whose results had turned sluggish has revamped itself to cater to the new changed market dynamic.

The business targets cars which are returning to the roads after a prolonged time, offering a full sanitisation and disinfection of these vehicles.

(Also read: Navi Mumbai Police vans turned to mobile sanitisation units)

Four businessmen, who used to run a business that services sofas, cars, toilets, and kitchens, have now shifted their focus to offering vehicle cleaning services.

"We thought about the idea as we didn't have any work during the lockdown. We saw someone doing something similar in Rohini and thought why not try it on our own. We had the machine for sanitisation and we decided to do it on our own. The virus spread really fast so we had to do this to stop it," Bharat Anand, one of the founders of this business told ANI

(Also read: What's allowed and what's not on Delhi roads)

Suited up in personal protection kits and face shields, and donning rubber gloves, the men say the job requires additional care and they have to sanitise everything everyday to prepare for the next day.

Rahul, one of the four men, who hails from West Bengal says the four of them locked down on the idea as they were in a tough financial position that emerged with businesses being clamped down during the lockdown as part of government guidelines imposed to curb the spread of Covid-19.

"We were doing cleaning work earlier but when the lockdown was imposed with some relaxation, we all decided to stand on the road with this idea," he says.

The process of sanitisation usually takes 15 minutes for two-wheelers and 20 minutes for a four-wheeler. The cost of sanitising a two-wheeler is Rs. 20 and for disinfecting a four-wheeler the estimated cost is 50 per vehicle.

The men usually set up their equipment on the roadside with a banner advertising their services draped on a vehicle to attract passersby.

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