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Adam Goldstein (R) and Brett Adcock, co-founders and co-CEOs of flying taxi company Archer Aviation, pose for a picture. (REUTERS)
Adam Goldstein (R) and Brett Adcock, co-founders and co-CEOs of flying taxi company Archer Aviation, pose for a picture. (REUTERS)

Just-showcased flying taxi can speed at 240 kmph for 100 kms. Check details here

  • US-based Archer Aviation says it wants to make mass market mobility solutions and could launch Maker flying taxi in Los Angeles and Miami by 2024.
  • Maker is a flying taxi that can seat four while not contributing to rising emission levels when on the move.

If you thought flying taxis are still several years into the future, you thought wrong. While a number of companies have been working on developing their respective versions that could also be commercially viable, US-based Archer Aviation recently showcased its 'Maker' - a flying taxi that could put you in its seat sooner than you may have previously thought.

Maker had quite a glitzy debut recently as Archer Aviation showcased what the flying taxi is capable of. At 240 kmph, it sure has the speed to become a viable option for fast transportation. And that it can remain airborne for around 100 kilometres is another crucial advantage. Including the pilot, the air taxi can seat four people in one go.

Maker isn't operational in commercial space but that it can set the foundation for flying transportation is quite certain. "Our real goal is to make a mass market transportation solution in and around cities," Brett Adcock, Co-founder and CEO of Archer Aviation, told news agency Reuters.

Flying taxis have the potential of becoming inter-city transport options but the key would also be on making these affordable. In the US, it could mean around $4 per passenger mile. But the biggest benefit would be the time saved as most global cities routinely face road congestion issues.

As such, Archer Aviation expects to commercially launch Maker in Los Angeles and Miami by 2024. And what could be helping its cause is the increased focus on zero-emission transport options that are affordable yet quick. But getting approvals and meeting safety norms could take some time as regulatory authorities in the US and the world over appear to tread extra carefully when it comes to flying taxis that can take off and land like choppers but can fly like planes.

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