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A motorist arranges fruits and vegetables for sale next to her vehicle, as an alternative mobile grocery stall, along the highway, following a lockdown due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, on the outskirts of Nairobi. (REUTERS)
A motorist arranges fruits and vegetables for sale next to her vehicle, as an alternative mobile grocery stall, along the highway, following a lockdown due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, on the outskirts of Nairobi. (REUTERS)

How business operated from car trunks is helping Kenyans tackle Covid-19 blues

  • Kenya has 1,286 confirmed cases of the COVID-19 and the disease has devastated crucial sectors of the economy like tourism and farm exports.
  • With businesses and services hit hard, many have turned towards operating from their vehicles which helps with mobility.

More Kenyans are starting to operate small businesses out of the boots of their cars to make ends meet as the coronavirus crisis has hit jobs and the economy.

The East African nation has 1,286 confirmed cases of the COVID-19 and the disease has devastated crucial sectors of the economy like tourism and farm exports.

Those problems have spilled over into the transport sector, where John Njenga's taxi business struggled to get passengers, forcing him to start hawking avocados and bananas from his car.

"I had to get something else to do to feed my family," he said as he sold his wares in a posh Nairobi neighbourhood.

"We are bringing services closer to people instead of them going to the market."

A motorist arranges processed honey for sale inside her car as an alternative grocery store along the highway.
A motorist arranges processed honey for sale inside her car as an alternative grocery store along the highway. (REUTERS)

Boniface Mbugua, who lost his catering job, drives his car to markets to sell food to traders.

Some, like Agnes Njoki, who used to repair mobile phones in a shop in downtown Nairobi, says selling bananas from her car next to a busy highway is even more lucrative.

"I don't think I will go back to my former job. This looks good for me," she said.

This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text. Only the headline has been changed.

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