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File photo used for representational purpose. (AFP)
File photo used for representational purpose. (AFP)

BMW to have five fully-electric models by 2021, 12 by 2023

  • BMW has already made a substantial financial commitment to R&D for fully-electric cars - the company reportedly invested 5.95 billion euros in 2019.
  • There are concerns that the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic fallout on a global scale might create massive roadblocks.

BMW is in the fast lane of going all-electric and despite the current challenges emanating due to the coronavirus pandemic the world over, remains determined to drive in five fully-electric models by 2021.

BMW has already made a substantial financial commitment to R&D for fully-electric cars - the company reportedly invested 5.95 billion euros in 2019, and is going full steam ahead. In a tweet on Sunday, the company underlined its commitment towards bringing in five fully-electric cars by 2021 and said that there would be a minimum of 12 by 2023.


As such, there are strong indications that BMWs running on conventional fuel could indeed be phased out in the years to come. Several industry experts feel that on a global scale, up to 50% of traditional drivetrain variant may be phased out starting 2021.

(Also read: Why BMW is irked with this Indian e-rickshaw maker)

BMW is not the only luxury car maker which is banking on electric technology to drive the change. Mercedes has taken some notable steps in this direction while even iconic sports car manufacturers like Porsche and Ferrari have been looking at exploring opportunities.

There are growing concerns, however, that the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic fallout on a global scale might create massive roadblocks in the push towards electric vehicles (EVs). The forecast for the global automotive industry is shrouded in gloom with even giants with deep pockets looking at uncertain times ahead. Demand is likely to come down to a trickle while disruptions in supply chains could combine to make life a whole lot tougher for car manufacturers.

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