Toyota's faulty certifications breach UN rules, says Japan government

Japanese transport ministry reportedly stated that the six cases of Toyota handing over faulty and manipulated safety test data before the production
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Toyota
For past four models, Japanese carmaker Toyota had submitted faulty data and manipulated results of collision tests (file photo used for representation.) (AP)
Toyota
For past four models, Japanese carmaker Toyota had submitted faulty data and manipulated results of collision tests (file photo used for representation.)

The Japanese government has found that regulatory discrepancies in a number of Toyota Motor Corp. cars also breach United Nations standards adopted by 62 countries and regions, the Yomiuri reported Tuesday without attribution.

While it’s unclear how regulators in each respective jurisdiction would respond, in theory this means affected models could be ordered off the roads in places other than Japan, including in the European Union. Toyota spokespeople weren’t immediately available for comment.

Japan’s transport ministry suspended the delivery and sale of six vehicles — including three made by Toyota — earlier this month after internal probes revealed inconsistencies and fraud in the safety certification applications of five major automakers, including Toyota, Honda Motor Co., Mazda Motor Corp., Yamaha Motor Co. and Suzuki Motor Corp.

Also Read : Toyota says sorry for cheating on vehicle tests

Safety scandal embroils

Toyota
File photo of the Toyota logo used for representational purpose. (REUTERS)
Toyota
File photo of the Toyota logo used for representational purpose. (REUTERS)

Toyota submitted faulty data during pedestrian-safety tests for three current models — the Corolla Fielder, the Corolla Axio and the Yaris Cross — and used modified test vehicles during collision-safety tests for four past models, including the Crown, the transport ministry said last week.

Toyota Chairman Akio Toyoda said in most cases, the vehicles were tested under harsher conditions than what the country’s regulations required, and clarified that all vehicles were safe to drive.

“We neglected the certification process and mass produced our cars without first taking the proper precautionary steps," Toyoda told reporters on June 3. “For that we apologise to our customers and all automotive enthusiasts."

Toyota, which holds its annual shareholder meeting next week, said shipment halts will impact two assembly lines responsible for the production of 130,000 units a year. The world’s biggest carmaker made and sold more than 11 millions passenger vehicles in 2023.

First Published Date: 12 Jun 2024, 06:34 AM IST
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